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  • BIBLE COURSE DESCRIPTIONS

    BI-1111. Old Testament Survey4 semester hours (also available through Moody Distance Learning)

    A survey of the entire Old Testament in its historical and cultural context in order to understand the general content of the Old Testament books (including the outstanding features and basic teachings), to understand the place of each book in God’s total, progressive revelation, and to understand how to apply practical principles for contemporary Christian living.


    BI-1112. New Testament Survey—4 semester hours (also available through Moody Distance Learning)

    A survey of the entire New Testament in its historical and cultural context, including the intertestamental period, in order to gain a knowledge of the life of Christ, the establishment of the church, and the teachings concerning the believer’s faith and practice.


    BI-1120. Elements of Bible Study—3 semester hours (available through Moody Distance Learning ONLY)

    Emphasizes the inductive Bible study method and basic principles of biblical interpretation and uses other methods and tools for Bible study. Students will learn how to get an overview of any book of the Bible, make observations and ask interpretative questions, distinguish between figurative and literal language, outline passages, and make applications from biblical principles.


    BI-2210. Gospel of John—3 semester hours

    A study of the fourth Gospel in light of its historical context, stated purpose, and development of theme in order to discover its testimony to the deity and saving work of the Lord Jesus Christ.


    BI-2211. John—3 semester hours (available through Moody Distance Learning ONLY)

    Come to know Jesus Christ better through the study of His life as uniquely presented by the apostle John. Learn the basic content of each chapter, follow the flow of John’s emphasis on belief throughout the book, delineate the key events and teachings of Christ, and experience personal growth in your own life through them.


    BI-2214. Acts—3 semester hours (also available through Moody Distance Learning)

    Examines Acts to understand the birth and growth of the church under the sovereign direction of the resurrected Christ. The emphasis in the course is on understanding the purpose of the book, with special consideration given to the literary structure of the book, problem passages, church growth, and personal application.


    BI-2230. Bible Introduction—3 semester hours (also available through Moody Distance Learning)

    A survey of the areas of general and special introduction that include inspiration, the canon of Scripture, the transmission of the biblical text from the original writings to the many modern versions, and an examination of the major critical questions concerning the Bible that provide the student with an apologetic for the Christian faith.


    BI-2270. Life in Bible Times—3 semester hours

    This course introduces students to the resources and methodological principles for studying and applying the finds of Bible backgrounds as an integral part of the process of biblical interpretation. Emphasis is given to the geography, history, and culture of the ancient Near East for the Old Testament, and the Jewish and Greco-Roman world for the New Testament. Counts as 3 hours OT or 3 hours NT credit for non-Bible or Theology majors. Can be credited as a Bible elective.


    BI-2271. Hebrew Grammar I—4 semester hours

    Introduces the Hebrew alphabet, vowels, morphology, and essential Hebrew grammar. Seeks to build a modest vocabulary and basic familiarity with translation as preparation for more advanced courses in the exegesis of the Hebrew Old Testament. Cannot be credited as a Bible elective.


    BI-2272. Hebrew Grammar II—4 semester hours

    A continuation of BI-2271 and a completion of Hebrew grammar. Teaches syntax and lexical work but focuses on vocabulary development and morphology essential to translation. An inductive analysis is done in key portions of the Hebrew Old Testament to solidify grammatical and syntactical forms. Can be credited as a Bible elective.


    BI-2280. Hermeneutics/Bible Study Methods—3 semester hours (also available through Moody Distance Learning)

    A course examining the principles and practice of biblical interpretation as well as the primary tools of biblical research. The student will become acquainted with the history of interpretation and a defense of the literal-historical-grammatical approach. Hermeneutical strategies will be used to interpret various literary genres, analyze structural relationships, perform word studies, and develop principles for accurate practical application. Prerequisite: MS-1102 Studying and Teaching the Bible.


    BI-2281. Greek Grammar I—4 semester hours (also available through Moody Distance Learning)

    An introductory study of New Testament Greek, including intensive drill in vocabulary, conjugations, declensions, and grammatical constructions, with translation of sentences from the textbook. Cannot be credited as a Bible elective.


    BI-2282. Greek Grammar II—4 semester hours (also available through Moody Distance Learning)

    A continuation of BI-2281 and a completion of the basis for developing proficiency in translation. Prerequisite: BI-2281 Greek Grammar I. Cannot be credited as a Bible elective.


    BI-3305. Old Testament Historical Literature I—3 semester hours

    Examines the biblical literature concerning early Israelite history from the period of Joshua through Saul. Includes analysis of the books of Joshua, Judges, Ruth, and 1 Samuel and introduces the student to the historical, archaeological, and geographical background of this period. Emphasizes the theological purpose and message of the historical material.


    BI-3307. Old Testament Historical Literature II—3 semester hours

    Examines the literature concerning the history of the Davidic dynasty found in the books of Samuel and Kings, from the anointing of David to the fall of Jerusalem. Introduces the student to the historical, archaeological, and geographical background of this period. Emphasizes the theological purpose and message of the historical material.


    BI-3308. Old Testament Historical Literature III—3 semester hours

    Examines the historical literature from the postexilic period. The perspective and purpose of the books of Chronicles are studied, as are Ezra, Nehemiah, and Esther. Introduces the student to the historical, archaeological, and geographical background of this period. Emphasizes the theological purpose and message of the historical material.


    BI-3311. The Pentateuch—3 semester hours

    Examines the books of the Pentateuch to understand the purpose and message of each. Topical studies focus on particular exegetical, historical, archaeological, geographical, and institutional issues. Special attention is paid to the Law and the development of the covenant. Not open to freshmen.


    BI-3312. Genesis—3 semester hours (also available through Moody Distance Learning*)

    A holistic presentation of the book that also seeks to examine specific exegetical problems. Introduces the student to historical, cultural, literary, and methodological issues. Emphasizes the book’s purpose and message through its biblical-theological development in order to reclaim its practical use and teaching in the church. Prerequisite: MS-1102 Studying and Teaching the Bible.


    BI-3313. Psalms—3 semester hours

    Examines the Psalter as literature, giving attention to Hebrew poetry, figures of speech, Old Testament worship, biblical theology, and interpretive method. Considers types of psalms, emphasizing the purpose, message, and structure of the Psalter as a whole in order to reclaim its practical use and teaching for the church. Prerequisite: MS-1102 Studying and Teaching the Bible.


    BI-3316. Major Prophets I—3 semester hours (also available through Moody Distance Learning*)

    Examines the book of Isaiah, giving attention to historical background and the critical issues surrounding the book while focusing primarily on detailed analysis of the content. Emphasizes the theological significance of the purpose and message of the book for both Old and New Testaments.


    BI-3323. Life of Christ—3 semester hours (also available through Moody Distance Learning*)

    A comprehensive study of the earthly life and ministry of the Lord Jesus Christ. The course focuses on a thematic and chronological view of Christ’s life and ministry, providing an interpretation of key events and discourses and their practical application. Not open to freshmen.


    BI-3325. Pauline Epistles I—3 semester hours (also available through Moody Distance Learning*)

    An expository study of 1 and 2 Corinthians, with attention given to the background, church problems, doctrine, and practical applications of these books. Prerequisite: BI-2280 Hermeneutics/Bible Study Methods.


    BI-3326. General Epistles—3 semester hours

    An expository study of the epistles of James, Peter, Jude, and John, which are analyzed against their historical background for their unique contributions to the life of the church and to the practice of the individual believer. Particular attention is given to problems related to the incursion of false teaching.


    BI-3333. Hebrews—3 semester hours (also available through Moody Distance Learning*)

    An expository study of the book that emphasizes the preeminence of the Lord Jesus Christ in His deity and high priestly ministry as a fulfillment of Old Testament theology. Applies the great spiritual truths of Hebrews to everyday living and Christian service. Not open to freshmen.


    BI-3353. Introduction to Biblical Archaeology—3 semester hours

    Analyzes the methods of Middle Eastern archaeology and evaluates its contributions to the study of biblical literature and history. While the student is introduced to the most significant discoveries and the controversies that have emerged, emphasis is on a balanced and informed perspective concerning archaeology and the Bible. Counts as 3 hours OT or 3 hours NT. Can be credited as a Bible elective. 


    BI-3355. Old Testament Biblical Theology—3 semester hours

    A systematic study of Old Testament progressive revelation by a methodology sensitive to the factors of history, culture, different human authors, form, and emphasis. Prerequisites: BI-1111 Old Testament Survey and BI-2280 Hermeneutics/Bible Study Methods.


    BI-3356. New Testament Biblical Theology—3 semester hours

    A systematic study of New Testament progressive revelation by a methodology sensitive to the factors of history, culture, different human authors, genre, and emphasis, in order to reclaim its practical use and teaching for the church. Prerequisites: BI-1112 New Testament Survey and BI-2280 Hermeneutics/Bible Study Methods. Can be credited as a Bible elective.


    BI-3371. Hebrew Exegesis I—4 semester hours

    An introduction to exegetical method, including word studies, textual criticism, figures of speech, and development of syntax. Select portions of poetic and historical literature are chosen from the Hebrew Old Testament for exegetical analysis. Students are trained in the use of primary exegetical tools. Prerequisites: BI-2272 Hebrew Grammar II. Can count as a Bible elective.


    BI-3372. Hebrew Exegesis II—4 semester hours

    A continuation of BI-3371 focusing on prophetic texts of the Hebrew Old Testament. Emphasizes development of exegetical method, including genre analysis, facility with advanced tools, biblical theology, hermeneutical issues, and communication, in order to reclaim skillful use of biblical Hebrew for the church. Prerequisite: BI-3371 Hebrew Exegesis I. Can count as a Bible elective. 


    BI-3383. Greek Exegesis I—4 semester hours (also available through Moody Distance Learning*)

    A more detailed study of the grammatical elements of New Testament Greek emphasizing the functional elements of the various parts of speech to improve skill in the exegesis of the text. Includes the principles employed in the exegetical method and uses selected portions of the Greek New Testament in applying these exegetical principles. Prerequisites: BI-2282 Greek Grammar II. Can count as a Bible elective. 


    BI-3384. Greek Exegesis II—4 semester hours

    A continuation of BI-3383, including studies in the science of textual criticism and the principles employed in the exegetical method. Uses selected portions of the Greek New Testament in applying these exegetical principles. Prerequisite: BI-3383 Greek Exegesis I. Can count as a Bible elective.


    BI-4400. Directed Reading/Study1–3 semester hours

    A directed reading/study program in the area of biblical studies for a limited number of students having a minimum 3.0 cumulative grade point average. To be arranged in consultation with the chair of the Department of Bible and the faculty member involved. Prerequisite: approval by the chair of the Department of Bible prior to registration. Can be credited as a Bible elective.


    BI-4401. Topics in Biblical Studies3 semester hours

    A senior-level course that treats special areas in either the Old Testament, the New Testament, or both. Topics will be chosen in accord with the professor’s interests and competencies, student interest, and the consent of the department. In previous semesters BI-4401 has examined Jesus in the Synoptic Gospels, the Theology of Mark, and Recent Research in Paul. May be repeated for credit if the topic differs. Prerequisite: TH-3330 Systematic Theology I.


    BI-4410. Romans—3 semester hours (also available through Moody Distance Learning*)

    An expository study of this doctrinally foundational book that stresses its contribution to the doctrines of salvation and sanctification, and to understanding the place of Israel and the church in the divine plan. Applies practical principles of Christian living to our contemporary society. Prerequisite: TH-3330 Systematic Theology I.


    BI-4411. Romans in Greek—3 semester hours

    Guides the student in the process of bringing to the study of Romans the knowledge and skills learned in Greek Grammar I–II and Greek Exegesis I. Emphasis is placed on exegesis of the most challenging passages in the letter. In addition, this course details the book’s contribution to the doctrines of sin, salvation and sanctification, and to understanding the place of Jew and Gentile in the divine plan. This course applies principles of Christian living to our contemporary society. BI-4411 counts as credit for BI-4410. Prerequisites: BI-3383 Greek Exegesis I and TH-3330 Systematic Theology I. 


    BI-4412. Old Testament Wisdom Literature—3 semester hours

    Introduces Old Testament wisdom literature, examining the wisdom of Psalms, Job, Proverbs, Ecclesiastes, and Song of Solomon. While emphasis is placed on understanding the purpose and message of each book, attention is given to understanding how each book functions as the authoritative Word of God and how this practical wisdom can be applied to life. Not open to freshmen.


    BI-4417. Major Prophets II—3 semester hours

    Examines the books of Jeremiah, Lamentations, and Ezekiel, giving attention to the historical background of the period surrounding the fall of Jerusalem but focusing primarily on a systematic interpretation of the text. Emphasis is given to the type of oracles that are used and the resulting message and theology that emerges. Not open to freshmen.


    BI-4418. Daniel and Revelation—3 semester hours (also available through Moody Distance Learning*)

    A study of two closely related prophetic books. Considers Daniel first as presenting the framework of prophecy. Examines Revelation as the completion and climax of the prophetic Scriptures. Counts as 3 hours OT or 3 hours NT. Not open to freshmen.


    BI-4422. Minor Prophets—3 semester hours

    Analyzes the oracles and message of each of the twelve Minor Prophets, exploring the function of the prophets and the special hermeneutics of prophetic literature. Attention is given to the literary argument and theological content of the text so that these books may be reclaimed for practical use and teaching in the church. Prerequisite: MS-1102 Studying and Teaching the Bible. Not open to freshmen. 


    BI-4427. Pauline Epistles II—3 semester hours (also available through Moody Distance Learning*)

    A study of the epistle of Christian liberty (Galatians) and the four epistles that emphasize church truth (Ephesians, Philippians, Colossians, Philemon). Includes the doctrine of justification by faith, the Spirit-filled life, the person and work of Christ, and the exalted position of the church. Not open to freshmen.


    BI-4432. Pauline Epistles III—3 semester hours (also available through Moody Distance Learning*)

    Considers the historical setting of 1 and 2 Thessalonians and ascertains principles of the Christian life from the perspective of the second coming of Christ. Also examines 1 and 2 Timothy and Titus, giving special attention to the Pauline authorship and the appropriateness of their teachings for the church and its ministry in our day. Not open to freshmen.


    BI-4452. Messianic Prophecy—3 semester hours

    Traces the course of messianic prophecy in the Old Testament as it related to Israel and the Jewish nation and also shows its fulfillment in the Person of the Lord Jesus Christ. Gives attention to Jewish interpretation of prophetic passages as expressed in Jewish literature. Counts as 3 hours OT. Can be credited as a Bible elective.


    BI-4483. Advanced Hebrew Reading I—3 semester hours

    Study focused on selected portions of the Old Testament to improve the student’s ability to read Hebrew. Emphasizes morphology, vocabulary, and syntactical recognition. Prerequisite: BI-3371 Hebrew Exegesis I.


    BI-4484. Advanced Hebrew Reading II—3 semester hours

    An extension of Advanced Hebrew Reading I that moves Hebrew vocabulary toward a cognate of 25. Emphasizes sight-reading of the more difficult Hebrew texts. The course also involves sharpening skills in reading of larger narrative sections, especially in identifying the more “macro-level” literary techniques employed by biblical writers. Assignments focus on aspects of historiography, textual discourse, syntax, and advanced textual criticism. Prerequisite: BI-3371 Hebrew Exegesis I.


    BI-4485. Advanced Greek Reading I—3 semester hours

    Greek Reading I reinforces the basic language competency gained in Greek Grammar I-II and Greek Exegesis I-II by enforcing review of all grammar covered (morphology and syntax), strengthening the student’s Greek vocabulary (down to words that occur 21 times or more in the NT), and teaching students to sight-read large portions of the Greek New Testament. At the instructor’s discretion, the course will incorporate elements of the exegetical method covered in Greek Exegesis II and may involve Greek composition (English to Greek) assignments. Technical assignments will be supplemented by exposition in class. Prerequisite: BI-3384 Greek Exegesis II. 


    BI-4486. Advanced Greek Reading II—3 semester hours

    Greek Reading II is a continuation of Greek Reading I, specifically in taking vocabulary down to words that occur 10 times or more in the NT, and in teaching students to sight-read the most difficult NT Greek texts. At the instructor’s discretion, the student may also be required to translate passages of the LXX as well as extracanonical classical, Hellenistic, and patristic Greek, noting developments within the language (historical grammar). The course includes additional experience in basic exegetical skills, composition, and readings in points of linguistics and advanced grammar. Other areas may be added at the instructor’s discretion. Prerequisite: BI-4485 Advanced Greek Reading I. 


    BI-4490. Senior Seminar—3 semester hours

    A capstone course designed to integrate the disciplines of the Bible and Theology majors and to determine levels of student competency. Attention will be given to Bible and theology content, hermeneutical methodology and skills, and an understanding of current trends and issues. Prerequisite: TH-3330 Systematic Theology I and TH-3340 Systematic Theology II.


    BI-4495. Biblical Studies Capstone—3 semester hours (available through Moody Distance Learning* and MBI–Spokane)

    The purpose of this course is to review, discover, and cement the overall goals of the Biblical Studies program. Objectives include the testing and refining of the following: writing, critical thinking, and communications skills; analytical, synthetic, and hermeneutical skills in interpreting the Bible and theology; the development of a personal doctrinal statement. Normally this course is taken at the end of the program. 


    Bible Lands Study Tour—3 semester hours

    A Bible Lands Tour especially for students. The course is designed to give students a personal, in-depth experience of the archaeology, history, culture, and geography of Israel. Three courses are offered for credit: Life in Bible Times (BI-2270); Introduction to Biblical Archaeology (BI-3353); and Life of Christ (BI-3323)—3 semester hours each. Additional courses may also be offered for credit. Can be counted as a Bible elective.

     

     

    * 3000 & 4000 level courses offered through Moody Distance Learning require department approval in advance for BA/BMus students. Back to Top 

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